The Step-Up

By

Dr. Brent Myers, DC

 

 

 

The Step-Up

A great exercise to prevent lower extremity injury & strengthen the glutes and hip flexors. It does a great job of balancing both sides of the body, as many times, one side is much stronger than the other. There are several types of step-ups out there and I perform several varieties with my patients. Here is a great version to help strengthen the hip flexors for the runner, as well strengthen the musculature on the inside of the knee.

 How To Perform

 As you step up, you will want to keep the weight on your heel, this will put the emphasis on the glutes, inside thigh, and hip flexors, next bring the rear leg upward, again pointing your toe and foot upward to get maximum activation of the hip flexors. Perform a total of 6-12 reps per leg (depending on your ability and training program)

 Be careful when adding weight, the most important aspect of the exercise is form.  Typically people use too much weight too fast, and this results in poor form.  The goal is to get the most “bang for your buck”, and to build a great base of strength in the inside quad and hip flexors.  So, emphasizing a lot of weight initially is not needed.

 Add this to your lower body routine to build strong legs that are structurally balanced, reducing your chances of injury.

 

About The Author:

 Dr. Brent Myers, DC, CCSP, ART practices out of Myers Chiropractic in Asheville, NC.  Dr. Myers is a former competitive bodybuilder and currently using powerlifting as a primary means of training.  Besides working with Crossfitters, Competitive Runners, Triathletes, and Cyclists, Dr. Myers also works with Clemson's Men's Basketball Team and Colorado Rockies Single A Affiliate The Asheville Tourists. All of the athletes receive some level of Chiropractic Care if needed, and a heavy dose of manual therapy, mobility and rehab exercises.

To learn more about Dr. Myers and his practice, check out his ClinicalAthlete Profile HERE.

 References

 http://www.jospt.org/doi/abs/10.2519/jospt.1996.24.3.136

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC164302/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4042320/