A movement & mobility tip from ClinicalAthlete Provider Josh James of MSC Performance in the United Kingdom: "Hit up some Goblet Half Y for lower trap recruitment. Improve your scapular stability with this exercise and see your Jerk, snatch, and overhead movement improve.

An assessment and movement tip from ClinicalAthlete Provider Dr. Clinton Lee of Clinton Lee Physical Therapy in New York City: "After noticing a surgical scar on my patient's right ankle I performed a squat assessment to screen for potential mobility problems. Significant medical history includes a right tibia and fibula fracture as well as posterior tibialis tendon lengthening, all about 10+ years ago.

A movement & mobility tip from ClinicalAthlete Provider Dr. Eric Lagoy, PT of Performance Physical Therapy in Hamden, CT: "During hip flexion, the femoral head glides back (posteriorly). This same glide occurs with internal rotation as well. If you want to improve squat mobility be sure to work both.

A movement & mobility tip from ClinicalAthlete Provider Josh James of MSC Performance in the United Kingdom: "Frog rocks are great for opening up the #hips, getting some deep flexion and abduction. Start with your toes into the ground (to represent squat mechanics) and progress your knees further out whilst changing feet position.

A movement & mobility tip from ClinicalAthlete Provider Dr. Quinn Henoch, PT of Juggernaut Training Systems in Orange County, CA: "To improve the effectiveness and safety of the half kneeling hip flexor stretch, elevate the front foot. This will protect the lower back from hyper-extension, and allow you a deeper stretch without having to shift forward an excessive amount.

A movement & mobility tip from ClinicalAthlete Provider Dr. Zach Long, PT (AKA TheBarbellPhysio) of the Carolina Sports Clinic in Charlotte, NC: "Why do I so frequently talk about the importance of testing an athletes hip hinge? Cause it is the foundation of SOOO many athletic moves.

A movement & mobility tip from ClinicalAthlete: Goblet squats are a fantastic tool to teach the squatting pattern. Holding a weight in front creates a counter-balance that allows the athlete to practice squatting straight down. This teaches the athlete how to fully use his or her hip, knee, and ankle mobility, while maintaining stability through the core.

Glute Bridges! If you have an athlete who lacks hip extension and tends to over extend through the lower back during regular supine bridges with feet flat on the floor, then try this variation. It will give them more range of motion to work with while staying neutral. Sets of 5.

A movement & mobility tip from ClinicalAthlete Student Pablo Orozco of Supple Performance Therapy: "Create, use, and own range of motion in as many planes as possible. This will not only lead to bigger gains with regular resistance training (snatch, squat, press, etc) but it also builds more resiliency for sport and life.